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Via Margutta 19
00187 Rome, Italy

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Via Condotti

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Via Margutta

Local attractions near Rome Luxury Suites

Spanish Steps

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Local attractions near Rome Luxury Suites

Trevi Fountain

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Local attractions near Rome Luxury Suites

Piazza del Popolo

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Local attractions near Rome Luxury Suites

Villa Borghese

The Villa Borghese, an easy stroll from any of our hotels in Rome, is Rome’s answer to Central Park. The largest green space in the historic center of…

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Rome Luxury Suites

Boutique Hotel

Rome Luxury Suites

Private Suites

Rome Luxury Suites

Luxury Townhouse

Via Mario de' Fiori 37/B
Rome 00187

T: + 39 06 6992 1907

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Via Margutta

Via Margutta is a short street with a long history. Its three gracious blocks go back 2,000 years. It’s thought that the name comes from a Latin euphemism—“sea…Read more

Via Margutta is a short …Read more

Via Margutta is a short street with a long history. Its three gracious blocks go back 2,000 years. It’s thought that the name comes from a Latin euphemism—“sea drop”— a kind of grand name for a drain, the foaming pool where waters poured down from the backhouses of Rome’s elite. The original buildings here were probably stables.

But they are stables no more. After hotelier Alberto Moncada dei Principi di Paterno’s great grandfather built artists’ studios along the street, Via Margutta became a magnet for every kind of artist and craftsman, composer and poet. By the 18th and 19th centuries, painters were arriving here in earnest.  Debussy, Liszt, Puccini and Wagner are all said to have lived on the Via Margutta. Stravinsky came here with his friend Pablo Picasso. It was also a centre for cinema – Gregory Peck’s apartment in Roman Holiday was here, and director Federico Fellini lived on the street for many years.

Today Via Margutta is arguably Rome’s most beautiful street. It’s tucked away yet central, hung with ivy, paved with cobblestones and ablaze with window boxes. It’s still an artistic centre, and is crammed full of small galleries, antique shops and restorers. The double-height, huge-windowed artists’ studios remain, some of which have been converted into Margutta 54.

Outside the courtyard of Margutta 54, you’ll see the Fountain of the Arts, a fitting tribute to all the artists that have passed this way.  It’s topped by a bucket with the tools of the trade, and at the base you’ll see two painters’ easels with two different faces representing the moods of the artist.

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Via Condotti

Via Condotti is the most fashionable street in Rome. Dating back to Roman times, it is named after conduits which carried water to the Baths of Agrippa.…Read more

Via Condotti is the most…Read more

Via Condotti is the most fashionable street in Rome. Dating back to Roman times, it is named after conduits which carried water to the Baths of Agrippa. Starting at the Spanish Steps, it is a vibrant street brimming with exclusive fashion retailers such as Armani, Fendi, Louis Vuiton, Guci, Prada, Bulgari,  and Valentino. Scattered among these luxury goods are historic sites of interest including Caffé Greco, Palazzo di Malta, Palazzo Della Porta Negroni Caffarelli & Chiesa della Santissima Trinità degli Spagnoli.

Radiating from Via Condotti is Via Babuino, linking the Spanish Steps with Piazza del Popolo. Via Babuino, appropriately twinned with Madison Avenue in New York, has a funkier, more relaxed feeling than Via Condotti, but is still packed full of a mix of big-hitting designers plus historic labels such as Italian hatters Borsalino.

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Spanish Steps

Did you know that the Spanish Steps were actually built by the French? In the 17 th century, the French built this elegant staircase to make the climb…Read more

Did you know that the Spanish…Read more

Did you know that the Spanish Steps were actually built by the French? In the 17th century, the French built this elegant staircase to make the climb to their church Trinita di Monti,  more appealing. However, they never ended up getting the credit. The flight led up from the Piazza di Spagna, home of the Spanish Embassy, so to locals and everyone else they have always been the “Spanish Steps”.

Today the Spanish Steps are a walkway to Rome’s heart, and the focal point for all of our hotels.  From this beautiful, sweeping centerpiece, the area’s streets lead off like spokes. Graceful fashion-central boulevards Via dei Condotti and Via del Babuino are full of top international brands from Bulgari to Versace. Each narrow, cobbled lane leading off these streets is a treasure trove of designer shops, independent boutiques, galleries and delis. The area feels almost like a small town, but one stuffed full of tantalizing shops and top-notch restaurants, with price tags to suit all budgets.

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Trevi Fountain

The most famous fountain in Europe, if not the world, the Trevi Fountain is another Rome must-see. Just at the edge of the Spanish Steps neighborhood,…Read more

The most famous fountain…Read more

The most famous fountain in Europe, if not the world, the Trevi Fountain is another Rome must-see. Just at the edge of the Spanish Steps neighborhood, it’s within a 10-minute walk from our three boutique hotels. But although it’s famous for its 18th-century, Baroque style, the Trevi Fountain’s roots go back far earlier.

In the 1st century B.C., Rome’s first emperor, Augustus, decided to build a new aqueduct—which meant he needed a fresh source of water. According to legend, his soldiers weren’t having any luck finding one… until a lovely young woman directed them to a spring. The resulting aqueduct was named the “Virgin Aqueduct.”

After barbarians sacked Rome, the city’s aqueducts fell into disrepair. The Virgin Aqueduct was the only one that kept running. And so, in the early 18th century, the pope decided to commission a grand fountain as thanks. The result—today’s Trevi Fountain—took architect Niccolo’ Salvi 30 years to build. Today, the fountain might be most famous for being the spot where Anita Ekberg and Marcello Mastroianni frolicked in Fellini’s 1960 film La Dolce Vita.

In the evening, take a passeggiata from Babuino 181, Mario dei’ Fiori 37, or Margutta 54 to visit the lit-up Trevi Fountain. And don’t forget to throw your three coins in. According to this time-held tradition, with one coin, you’ll return to Rome; two, return and fall in love; and three, return, fall in love, and marry.

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Piazza del Popolo

A few paces away is the Piazza del Popolo, a vast oval public space edged by three harmonious churches. It’s centered on an ancient Egyptian obelisk that…Read more

A few paces away is the …Read more

A few paces away is the Piazza del Popolo, a vast oval public space edged by three harmonious churches. It’s centered on an ancient Egyptian obelisk that was brought to Rome in 10BC by Emperor Augustus.

Piazza del Popolo means ‘People’s Square’, but it was in fact named after the Basilica of Santa Maria del Popolo on one corner (St Mary of the Poplars).  This is one of Rome’s most glorious churches. Inside you’ll find two enormous, fearsomely dramatic Caravaggio paintings, as well as a chapel decorated by Raphael and Bernini.

The piazza is the starting point for the ancient Roman road, Via Flaminia, which is marked by a grand gateway. Until the advent of flight, this was for many their first view of Rome as they approached the city from the north, and it’s suitably impressive. The current look of the square dates from the 19th century, when it was remodeled by architect Giuseppe Valadier, who also incorporated and landscaped the route up the Pincio hill, a viewpoint at the edge of the Villa Borghese gardens. You can walk up the zigzagging path from the piazza for soaring, romantic city views.

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Villa Borghese

This beautiful park was once the playground of one of Rome’s foremost and most powerful families, the Borghese. Opened to the public since 1903 when the…Read more

This beautiful park was once…Read more

This beautiful park was once the playground of one of Rome’s foremost and most powerful families, the Borghese. Opened to the public since 1903 when the Rome City Council bought the gardens, they’re a verdant, bucolic place to breathe. Full of huge trees dappling the sunlight, there are still the many sculptures from the Borghese era lining the walkways.

You can either choose to wander, picnic, rent bikes, go-cars and golf carts and even glide around on a Segway.  But the gardens’ magnificent centerpiece is the Galleria Borghese, built by the immensely powerful connoisseur Cardinal Borghese to house his spectacular art collection. Not only is it a fantastically glorious baroque building, but you’ll find masterpieces by Bernini, Titian and Caravaggio, and spectacular Roman mosaic floors.  To visit the gallery you’ll need a reservation so ask our concierge to make one for you in advance of your arrival.

Other splendours in the park include a replica of Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, as well as the extraordinary historic collection of the Etruscan museum and the modern art collection of the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna.

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